The Arch City Gardener

Journeys In St. Louis Gardening and Beyond

The Morning Garden After a Rain

Leave a comment

Raindrops cling to gracefully arching spears of green and white ribbon grass.

Raindrops cling to gracefully arching spears of green and white ribbon grass.

Rain-soaked petals, leaves and grasses were inspirational during this morning’s coffee stroll.

One of the few patio tomatoes the squirrels have not yet found.

One of the few patio tomatoes the squirrels have not yet found.

I love how raindrops cling to plants. Or is it the other way around? Either way, morning light is my favorite time to take pictures. It’s a challenge to get the lighting right and I am more often disappointed with my photos than I am pleased.

Rose leaves are especially photogenic after a rain.

Rose leaves are especially photogenic after a rain.

Everything appears refreshed after a nice soaking rain. Don’t be fooled, though, the humidity is unbearably high and I had to repeatedly wipe off the foggy lens. In fact, the outsides of the windows were also foggy this morning. Nothing refreshing about that at all.

The roses seem to be thriving in the hot temperatures and humidity.

The roses seem to be thriving in the hot temperatures and humidity.

I have to add one more rose picture…

Clinging rain drops enhance the beauty of this fading rose.

Clinging rain drops enhance the beauty of this fading rose.

The succulents look wonderful rain soaked as well. I have been enjoying my first succulent container and the variety of colors, shapes and textures.

succulent

The grayish blue succulent (graptopetalum paraguayense) is known as ghost plant. I call it wonderful.

The jade plant in this container has received a lot of moisture this summer but does not seem not be suffering from it.

The jade plant in this container has received a lot of moisture this summer but does not seem not be suffering from it.

The “Little Lamb” and “Little Lime” hydrangeas are in full bloom. Their heavy blooms have been weighed down by all the heavy rains. But they are lovely nonetheless.hydrangea leavesThis summer marks my first go around with Euphorbia; this “Ascot Rainbow” is sharing space in a large, bright blue pot with deep purple coleus and hot pink vinca and will find a permanent place in the garden this fall.

Spurge Ascot Rainbow

Euphorbia x martinii. Aren’t the variegated leaves interesting? I look forward to writing more about this plant.

Advertisements

Author: mjarz

Welcome to the Arch City Gardener. My name is Mimi and I started this blog to share my journeys in learning to garden in St. Louis County, Missouri and learn more from my readers who garden. Thanks for reading The Arch City Gardener.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s