The Arch City Gardener

Journeys In St. Louis Gardening and Beyond


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Wordless Wednesday: Am I Blue!

blue and brown (1280x960)

“Fat Albert” dwarf blue spruce.

Spruce springsteenDwarf blue

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Great Pairings for Shade

There’s no denying a dynamic combination when we see one. John, Paul, George and Ringo; tomato, mozzarella and basil; red wine and chocolate are three that come quickly to mind. As planning for the new shade bed along the south fence takes on more mental bandwidth, I’m focusing on great combinations that incorporate texture, shape, color and proportion. It can be enough to make my head spin, especially since I have had limited success in the deep shade areas of the yard.

To date my focus has been mostly on the sunny combinations I have been able to put together. Pots provide an inexpensive way to experiment with combinations. Each year I try and experiment with different textural and color combinations, keeping in mind the “filling, thrilling, spilling” trinity. And I have a sunny spot in the yard that I affectionately refer to as my “experimental bed.” There I have introduced all kinds of specimens that I have later moved to other sunny beds.

This pot of purple fountain grass, sweet potato vine and creeping jenny help screen the gutter by the front of the garage.

This pot of purple fountain grass, sweet potato vine and creeping jenny help screen the gutter by the front of the garage.

Yellow and orange dazzle during the hottest time of the day.

Yellow and orange dazzle during the hottest time of the day. The coreopsis, which thrives in this spot, got its start in the so-called “experimental bed.”

And while these combinations have been fun and lively, they won’t do for the shade. I began experimenting under the tree by the south fence last summer by planting two types of fern, hosta and astilbe. I may have planted one of the ferns (sensitive fern [Onoclea sensibilis]) too deep as it did not perform well; the astilbe withered, and the hosta tried to hang on for dear life but looked pathetic. I will wait to see if the ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris) reappears and plan to move it to the other end of the bed and plant a variegated solomon seal (Polygonatum) beneath the tree instead.

This is a long runway of fence to fill (about 28 feet) and I want something tall in the center. That’s where part of my angst comes in. What to plant? What to plant? A hydrangea of some sort? I have hydrangeas in two beds and love them but I want to branch out and try something new. I envision white caladium running along the length of the bed, filled in with hakonechloa grasses to brighten the shady spot. Other contenders include astilbe, large hosta, heuchera and brunnera. None of these meet the height requirement I am seeking. Any ideas, fellow gardeners? I am considering a vine or a small tree to put in the center of the bed to provide vertical interest.

If indecision gets the best of me this year, I will resort to moving a tall concrete plant stand and placing a lovely pot on top, keeping in mind the successful combination “filling, thrilling and spilling.” As always, thanks for reading.

 The new bed along the fence is waiting to be planted. My winter day dreaming is under way.

A blank slate–the shade bed along the fence.

I have concentrated on planting in the sunny spots in the yard but have found a few shady areas to fil lin.

Another bright green and purple combination, this time for a shady spot. The coral bloom adds yet another colorful layer.

The silvery gray-green of the artemisia contrasts with the pink roses and spikey angelinia in the pot.

The silvery gray-green of the silver mound artemesia contrasts with the pink roses and the potted white angelonia.


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Trying to Grow Orchids

Orchid #2 leaf growth (640x480)I’m fairly excited. I truly am. I came in from my dark, 10 degree F (-12 C) work commute to discover one of my orchids seems to be growing! There are new leaves and “shoots” (for lack of a better word) coming off the stems. Could this plant actually be–dare I say it–thriving?

I find the world of houseplants to be more frustrating than my garden. Mostly it’s because I have limited space for them. But I enjoy the green beauty of a houseplant, especially in winter. I have two orchids, both from the grocery store, that were given to me as gifts. I believe they are Phalaenopsis or “moth orchids.” My first orchid was given to me two years ago at Christmas, and, it’s not doing the greatest (more on that in a minute). My performing orchid was given to me in August; both were in glorious bloom when I received them. Of course, I watched, misted, fed and fretted what I should do when the blooms die. Do I cut the stems down? The instructions on both tags told me to give the orchid 3 ice cubes a week. And to give it plenty of light. Check. Check. No problem following those simple instructions.

Orchid #2 stems

The browning stem makes me nervous? Do I cut this completely down? Trim it as it browns? Leave it alone? This time I opted to leave it alone.

But I do get nervous once the blooms fade and fall off. That’s because the stems begin to turn brown from the top down. Yikes, do I cut that off? Just trip off the dead stuff down to the nodule on the stem? Well, on the first plant I cut the stems when they completely turned brown and looked dead. I figured the plant would grow new stems. Hmmmmm, not so much.

Orchid #2 new growth

There’s new growth emerging from the stem of Orchid #2.

So when plant #2’s blooms faded and fell, I repeated the same step. Only this time, the stems are not completely brown and growth is coming off the nodules of the stem. And–yes, there’s more good news here–there is new leaf growth. Truthfully, that does not excite me nearly as much as the stem growth because Orchid #1 had lots and lots of leaf and root growth after the stems died. In fact, it had so much leaf and root growth that I re-potted it after I had it more than a year and it seemed rather apparent that it was not going to rebloom. I thought that perhaps the thing was root bound.

Orchid #1 doesn't seem so happy, even though I have treated it the same way as its sibling orchid. What gives?

Orchid #1 doesn’t seem so happy, even though I have treated it the same way as its sibling orchid. What gives?

I went to one of my favorite nurseries, bought a pot and planting material. I already had the orchid food, and the ice cubes. But I got nothing; the poor thing has not performed.

Maybe sibling rivalry will kick in and will start doing something, lest it be shown up by its younger sister.


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A Closer Look at What’s Coming Up in the Garden

Here’s a close up of what’s blooming and coming up in my yard. I took these photos over the weekend, before we were hit with high winds and lots of rain.

A newcomer to the garden, I love the "freckles" on this guy.

A newcomer to the garden, I love the “freckles” on this guy.

Bloodgood Japanese Maple was the centerpiece of my gardens and the first specimen I planted in 2012. In fact, it was the first tree I had ever planted. During spring the leaves seem to change color daily.

Bloodgood Japanese Maple was the centerpiece of my gardens and the first specimen I planted in 2012. In fact, it was the first tree I had ever planted. During spring the leaves seem to change color daily.

lady's mantel april 2014

I can’t wait to watch one of the new additions to the garden–lady’s mantle. This is one of the plants I am obsessed with this year.

 

I am glad to see this shrub blooming. I see azaleas all over St. Louis and really like them, but have a hard time growing them. I plan to move my azaleas to a new location this fall in the hopes that a new spot will be better

I am glad to see this shrub blooming. I see azaleas all over St. Louis and really like them, but have a hard time growing them. I plan to move my azaleas to a new location this fall in the hopes that a new spot will be better

I moved my Frances William hostas because they were getting too much sun. The new spot has morning sun and afternoon shade. I love  the way this plant unfolds as it comes out of the ground

I moved my Frances William hostas because they were getting too much sun. The new spot has morning sun and afternoon shade. I love the way this plant unfolds as it comes out of the ground

The rhododendron got the worst of the winter and suffered lots of leaf scorch. It's blooms are beautiful though.

The rhododendron got the worst of the winter and suffered lots of leaf scorch. It’s blooms are beautiful though.

This silver mound is vigorous and hardy and is a wonderful groundcover at the edge of the patio bed.

This silver mound is vigorous and hardy and is a wonderful ground cover at the edge of the patio bed. Notice how the water droplets magnify on artemisia’s feathery leaves.


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In the Garden: What a Difference a Month Makes

Life in the backyard is abuzz with growth! Just one month ago, perennials were just beginning to push their way through the soil. Take a look and see for yourself the plant progress in my St. Louis garden.

This bed beneath the family room window and bordering the patio, looked rather barren on March 29.  The small bit of green is Meadow Sage.

This bed beneath the family room window and bordering the patio, looked rather barren on March 29. The small bit of green is Meadow Sage.

I had yet to trim back the roses and still need to add mulch. There are four KnockOut rose shrubs in this bed, three of them planted last year. This bed faces east and gets lots of morning sun as well as sun from the south.

Mother Nature is not the only one who has been busy. I have added the rocks to better direct the drainage from the downspout, cleaned out the bed and trimmed the roses. I have added a few plants as well, although the vast majority are perennials planted over the past three years.

Mother Nature is not the only one who has been busy. I have added the rocks to better direct the drainage from the downspout, cleaned out the bed and trimmed the roses. I have added a few plants as well, although the vast majority are perennials planted over the past three years.

This is one of my favorite beds. Everything I have put in this bed has been happy, happy, happy as Phil would say on Duck Dynasty. In addition to the roses and Mianacht salvia (salvia x sylvestris), there are Cranesbill Biokova Karmina (geranium x cantabrigiense) which edge the bed. These mounding plants have wonderful year round interest, their leaves turning deep green to crimson red in the fall and winter. In early summer they are filled with small rose-hued flowers. Filling in the bed are Shasta daisy(Leucanthemum × superbum), variegated lily turf (liriope muscari), threadleaf coreopsis and new this season, Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla mollis). I added the lady’s mantle to the north end of the bed, near the door, to bring some yellow to that end of things. I also transplanted a small and struggling shasta that had been in a bed near the fence. Anchoring the bed near the rocks on the south end is a low-to-the ground, creeping juniper (Juniperis horizontalis).  This evergreen has lots of yellow in, which complements the hot pink of the roses and brightens the deep purple of the salvia.

I also like this bed because it wraps around to the south, which gets gobs of sun. It begins its southern turn where the Russian Sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia) is anchored. I added two Stella D’Oro lilies(Hemerocallis) to play off the color in the juniper and contrast with the cool lavender of the Russian Sage. This small grouping is a nice segue to the south-facing part of the bed. I’ll share more of that in another post.

How’s  your garden growing?